Amateur radio ham radio

Duration: 8min 30sec Views: 1671 Submitted: 11.07.2020
Category: Brunette
Forgot Password? Amateur Radio ham radio is a popular hobby and service that brings people, electronics and communication together. People use ham radio to talk across town, around the world, or even into space, all without the Internet or cell phones. It's fun, social, educational, and can be a lifeline during times of need.

What is Ham Radio

What is Amateur Radio? Ham Radio » Electronics Notes

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Amateur radio still enjoys great popularity as a hobby. Contrary to many pessimistic opinions, younger generations are discovering amateur radio again as an ideal hobby for the practical application of technical interest in connection with computers and radio technology.

EA Digital Federation

Amateur radio , also known as ham radio , is the use of radio frequency spectrum for purposes of non-commercial exchange of messages, wireless experimentation, self-training, private recreation, radiosport , contesting , and emergency communication. The term "amateur" is used to specify "a duly authorised person interested in radioelectric practice with a purely personal aim and without pecuniary interest;" [1] either direct monetary or other similar reward and to differentiate it from commercial broadcasting , public safety such as police and fire , or professional two-way radio services such as maritime, aviation, taxis, etc. The amateur radio service amateur service and amateur-satellite service is established by the International Telecommunication Union ITU through the Radio Regulations. National governments regulate technical and operational characteristics of transmissions and issue individual stations licenses with a unique identifying call sign , which must be used in all transmissions. Amateur operators must hold an amateur radio license which is obtained by passing a government test demonstrating adequate technical radio knowledge and legal knowledge of the host government's radio regulations.
Will the amateur airwaves fall silent? Since the dawn of radio, amateur operators—hams—have transmitted on tenaciously guarded slices of spectrum. Electronic engineering has benefited tremendously from their activity, from the level of the individual engineer to the entire field. But the rise of the Internet in the s, with its ability to easily connect billions of people, captured the attention of many potential hams. Now, with time taking its toll on the ranks of operators, new technologies offer opportunities to revitalize amateur radio, even if in a form that previous generations might not recognize.